“What If 1 Million Americans Asked for Medical Records on the Same Day?”

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn

farzadThe following post ran yesterday on Health Populi, see the original post here.

This was not a theoretical question Dr. Farzad Mostashari, former head of the Office of the National Coordinator of Health IT in the Department of Health and Human Services, asked yesterday at the closing keynote of Day 1 of the Patient Engagement Forum.

Dr. Mostashari issued a challenged to the community of mischief-makers in health/tech patient advocacy: tell everyone you know to contact their doctors — by phone, email, patient portal, or in-person, on one designated day which he called a “Day of Action.”

Health IT journalist Neil Versel (disclosure: also a long-time friend in the field) covered this news story here in MedCity News.

In the meantime, here is my (abridged) transcript of Dr. M’s talk, thanks to my note-taking skills. My own words are between carrots <> to provide additional context. (more…)

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Setting the Agenda to Create a Learning Public Health System

academyhealthIf you were opening a small business or starting a new household project, what would be your first step? You would likely read reviews and talk to experts or others who have already successfully reached similar goals in the most efficient and effective way. A common sense approach would be to look for – and identify – the best route to success, pulling information from a variety of sources.

It’s the same method we need to understand the best strategies for the nation’s public health system, which faces everyday pressures from health threats like measles, flu and antimicrobial resistant infections. The system is in a constant process of learning what works. But what would happen if we could harness gaps in information and better spread up and scale our successes? What if a sort of “Angie’s List” pointed to what works best to improve the nation’s health?  A “learning public health system” would result from better collection, integration and analysis of health data.     (more…)

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Glimpse of 12th Annual World Health Care Congress

kymThank you, Disruptive Women in Health Care, for the opportunity to attend the 12th Annual World Health Care Congress and Exhibition (WHCC) held in Washington, DC on March 22nd-March 25th.

Despite thirty-two years of repetitive engagement with the healthcare system to manage my four unique cancer diagnoses, my fifteen-year marriage to an MD informatician, my two years as a Patient Opinion Leader and my role as founding Co-chair of the Patient Experience Council, I had vague knowledge of the business of healthcare prior to attending WHCC.

As a real world, experienced Patient Opinion Leader, I carry balanced messages forward to inform industry leaders of patient-centric issues and opportunities, as well as messages about healthcare system challenges and innovations back out to patients to convey the vital role they each play in transforming care. Healthcare conferences provide a prime opportunity for this pivotal exchange of information and building of shared empathy to occur. (more…)

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Comparative Effectiveness Research: Through the Lens of Medical Innovation

Randel Richner

Disruptive Women is embarking on an exciting week…Tuesday we head to NYC where we will be emceeing XX in Health as their retreat takes over the boy’s club (The Harvard Club). Then on Thursday we will be talking to women in tech at MassMEDIC. So as we interact with new disruptive women this week we wanted to reflect back and run some powerful posts from the past. Be sure to check the blog all this week for some of our favorites.

The Top headline of FDA News Device Daily today read, “Comparative Effectiveness Research has Benefits, Risks Experts Say”. Why would Device Daily consider comparative effectiveness to be risky? Many obvious concerns come to mind. There are distinct risks that the process imposed on the device industry may stifle growth. Worries abound related to the direction policy makers may employ such as when studies will be required (e.g., at the early stages of development, or later in the cycle of real-world experience), how studies will be conducted (e.g., by the government or a public/private entity), who will determine the type, scope, design and rationale for conducting such studies, what the studies will be used for (e.g., to restrict coverage, to control access). (more…)

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HHS move is a great moment for coordinated care and value-based payments

Cyndy Nayer

In a just-released move, HHS has accelerated the focus on new payment structures for Medicare beneficiaries, responding to President Obama’s goal of 30% of beneficiaries in ACOs (accountable care organizations) by 2016, with a goal of 50% by end of 2018.

cyndy 1.29It’s a great moment for the shift from fee-for-service to coordinated care and value-based payments.  In the ACO, or accountable care model, each patient is tracked through a quarterback physician who oversees the processes, screenings, interventions and outcomes for the team of clinical providers.  The ACO is paid for better outcomes, including but not limited to lower readmissions, higher control of chronic conditions (such as diabetes and heart disease), and use of evidence-based guidelines for screening and treatment. (more…)

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When Size Affects Your Odds

durkin_helenOncologists are on board in the fight against obesity. And they’ve made it official by issuing their first-ever Position Statement on Obesity and Cancer through the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

That’s especially great news for women—who are twice as likely as men to be affected by the nearly half a million new cases of obesity-related cancers worldwide each year. Not surprisingly, the greatest proportion of them are in North America. (http://ow.ly/FacZg http://ow.ly/Fadcm)

Despite the fact that more American men than women are overweight or obese, U.S. women are disproportionately affected by the obesity-cancer link. Obesity not only puts a woman at greater risk of cancer—especially post-menopausal breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and colon cancer—but it worsens her odds for surviving it as well. (http://ow.ly/FacZg http://ow.ly/Fadcm http://ow.ly/H8C3C) (more…)

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Trend-weaving the 2015 health care trends

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn

‘Tis the season for annual health trendcasting, which is part of my own business model. Here’s a curated list of some of my favorite trend reports for health care in the new year, with my Hot Points in the conclusion, below, summarizing the most salient trends among them.

TechCrunch’s Top 5 Healthcare Predictions for 2015: In this succinct forecast, Walmart grows its presence as a health plan, startups get more pharm-funding, hospitals channel peer-to-peer lending, Latinos emerge as a “most-desired” health care segment, and Amazon disrupts the medical supply chain.

Experian 2015 Data Breach Forecast: Healthcare security breaches will be a persistent and growing threat in 2015, with “the expanding number of access points to Protected Health Information (PHI) and other sensitive data via electronic medical records and the growing popularity of wearable technology,” based on this credit/risk management company’s assessment. The value of medical identity threat is very high. As a result, the FBI warned the health care industry that their security systems were insufficient compared with other industry sectors, according to Reuters. (more…)

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Kaiser Family Foundation Understanding Health Insurance & Open Enrollment Resources

The Kaiser Family Foundation recently released the resources below to help people understand insurance and the Affordable Care Act’s marketplaces. We found them helpful and hope you do too.

 Understanding Health Insurance: Consumer Resources

  • Understanding Health Insurance: Consumer Resources (Updated Web Page)
  • Health Insurance Marketplace Calculator (Interactive)
  • Health Insurance Explained: The YouToons Have It Covered (Video)
  • Health Reform Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
  • Health Insurance Quiz (Quiz)
  • Health Coverage, HIV & You (Web Portal) (more…)


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A Week of Music and Health Quality

Cyndy Nayer

Highlights from Stevie Wonder and the meetings of Boston and DC.

albumsIt was a week of meetings, concert, new ideas, gorgeous weather, and finding new friends–a week of quality, indeed.  Here are some findings, some musings, and some encouragement to all who are seeking to build quality and safety into health outcomes.

Boston:  No surprise that this beautiful city is accelerating some of the changes we want to see in health care and health outcomes. Meetings with new folks have fueled my energy in advancing the agenda in the all-important Rx development and access.  What’s missing is the value of new and developing treatments in improving the total value proposition:  what’s the worth in a family (quality of life during treatment), a worksite (lower absenteeism and lowering income loss), and to a person (less side effects, easier adherence, getting to cure [where possible]).  Of course I’ve written about this before (Framework for Outcomes-Based ContractingSovaldi Value of a CureSovaldi OBC Contract–Kiss is Still a Kiss), providing the business and outcomes models for using a high-cost drug that gets the person to goal. (more…)

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Preventing Prescription Drug Abuse: Are You Doing Your Part?

Terri Prof Headshot 0412Do you know what your teen is up to when you’re not looking?  What about your spouse, your parents and your friends?  Hopefully they aren’t rummaging through your medicine cabinet to find something they can take to get high. Many of us would never think to use a prescription drug for something other than its intended purpose, or to take something that wasn’t prescribed for us and absolutely necessary.

Unfortunately, there are a lot of other people who not only consider this, but act on the impulse to misuse and abuse prescription drugs.  Sometimes they work the system and see a doctor, or multiple doctors, and get the prescription for themselves, but often, they are looking through your medicine cabinet when you’re in the other room, getting them for free from friends or buying them online or from dealers.

Prescription drug abuse is a growing problem; according to the Centers for Disease Control it is an epidemic.  Just like any addiction, it can ultimately ruin or even end someone’s life.  (more…)

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Free the Data Announces New Partnership with Rep.Wasserman Schultz

Sharon Terry

FTD_logo3WASHINGTON, DC (October 8, 2014)—Free the Data, a national coalition of organizations dedicated to freeing genetic information, announced that U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (FL-23) was named its Honorary Chair.

“The time for hoarding data as a commodity is over,” said Sharon Terry, President and CEO of Genetic Alliance, the nonprofit health advocacy organization that coordinates Free the Data. “The Coalition is thrilled to have a powerful partnership with Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz. In Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we are confident that the Congresswoman adds strength and momentum to the Free the Data movement, particularly as we work to free data associated with breast and ovarian cancer!” (more…)

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An Interview with Kimberly Baxter, Director of the Iowa Accountability Program

baxter

Kimberly Baxter

Domestic violence can strike both rural and urban communities, impacting over 6,000 Iowans each year.  And while African Americans only make up approximately 3.2% of the state’s population, the 2011 preliminary Iowa Uniform Crime Report states that African Americans comprise 15% of domestic violence victims and 24% of domestic violence offenders.   In addition, 18% of cases in which the victim was also the offender involved African American victims.

The Iowa Accountability Program (IAP) is doing something about it.  The program—a grant project funded through the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women—aims to improve the judicial system’s response to domestic violence in Iowa.  Recently, the IAP launched a Judicial Training Institute and the Domestic Violence Court pilot program in Black Hawk County.   The IAP legal fellow, Julianne Toia, recently sat down with Kimberly Baxter—Director of the Iowa Accountability Program—to discuss these newly implemented programs and how they will impact the handling of domestic violence incidents in the State of Iowa. (more…)

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Linking Domestic Violence and Chronic Disease: An Issue Missing from the Headlines

With domestic violence getting attention lately due to the Ray Rice video and the newly crowned Miss America Kira Kazantsev’s domestic violence platform, the Society for Women’s Health Research believes it is important to highlight an important subject missing from the headlines.

There has been radio silence about the acute and chronic health conditions that affect women who suffer from this abusive behavior. Black eyes, bruises and broken bones are all what we expect to hear from victims who experience violence at the hand of a loved one.

There has been little to no attention, however, given to other health conditions, such as arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol and asthma, just to name a few of the afflictions that may develop long after the violence has stopped. In addition to these physical health consequences, there are psychological effects and conditions that women may experience – fear, anxiety and PTSD, all of which may indirectly give rise to other ailments. (more…)

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The Rise of Consumer Centricity: Comments on the Gamechanging Opportunities

Cyndy Nayer

In commenting on the new IMS Pharma Letter, we highlight the emergence and widespread build up of the consumer’s role in prevention, care and outcomes. Consumer centricity is being driven by the rise of CDHP (consumer directed health plans), but it’s quite different from these insurance products, with their high deductibles and variable co-pays.

Consumers are learning and experiencing more about consumer-directed health plans (CDHP) as they enter the exchanges, even though CDHP has been around for fifteen years or more.  Most new health insurance products have a deductible that must be met, so consumers must pay for services and treatments until they reach that goal.  NOTE:  the ACA (Obamacare) mandates that no individual pay more than $6350 in total out-of-pocket costs in Y2014).  If they have not paid the sum, they will pay more of their own money for the care.

Consumer centricity in health care means that control for choice of service and for outcomes will shift to the  consumers and they will become the ultimate arbiters in their health and health care.  It’s a value-based concept that drives this shift in decision-making. IT supports the data so that the consumer can decide where, when, why and who to choose for care based upon personal preferences and goals, total costs, incentives to engage and time to get to the outcome preferred. (more…)

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Why I Fight for Change in Domestic Violence Legislation

In 2009 I became the victim of a violent crime, domestic assault with a weapon. The local newspaper’s front page story included the following phrases: “Felony Assault,” “Domestic Assault with a Weapon,” “False Imprisonment,” “beaten,” “hit about the head and body,” “beaten with hands, knees and feet,” “urinated on,” “beaten with a wrought iron cross,” “refused to let leave or use the telephone,” “numerous injuries,” “numerous bite marks about her body,” “lost consciousness,” “escaped.” Lucky to be alive should have been included.  (more…)

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