Disruptive Woman Launches a Breakthrough in Parenting

One of the original Disruptive Women contributors, Glenna Crooks recently launched a new business. Last week the Syracuse New Times published an interview with her. Read the interview here and learn more about Sage My Life.

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  • February 11th, 2015 On a Mission of Hope: Nurse, Entrepreneur, Humanitarian Sharon Hackney-Robinson
    By Glenna Crooks
  • The phone is a gateway drug to health: what MyFitnessPal knows, and what Under Armour gets

    Jane Sarasohn-Kahn

    The following post first ran on Health Populi.

    65 million people know that food journaling works for losing weight, that it’s engaging to do on a well-designed app, and that health is social. MyFitnessPal (MFP) has the distinction of being a top health app used longer by more people and more effectively than probably any other mobile health tool.

    MFP-acquired-by-Under-Armour-Connected-Health-Feb-15Under Armour, the athletic goods company, now has MFP under its corporate umbrella, along with Endomondo, another very popular motivating mobile health tool.

    You may know Under Armour as a company that manufactures and markets functional workout gear. But this deal is so not about the wearable.

    It’s about building a health data ecosystem, the kind my smart colleague Carol Torgan terms an Electronic Fitness Record (EFR). Carol riffs off of the Electronic Medical Record (EMR) concept, which is taking off in the health care system: in doctors’ offices and in hospitals, motivated by financial incentives afforded through the HITECH Act which was bundled into the Stimulus Bill (aka ARRA, The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. That’s the digital locus for patients’ personal health care information generated during visits to doctors, clinics, clinical labs, imaging centers, pharmacies, and other touchpoints in the health care system. (more…)

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    Music as Medicine

    Lisa-Suennen-photoThe following post is written by Lisa Suennen one of our 2015 Women to Watch. It originally ran on her blog Venture Valkyrie.

    It happens every time. I hear “Bad to the Bone” on the radio and suddenly all is right with the world. I love music and I have learned that if I choose the correct genre and tempo  I can improve a depressed state or calm a hyper one. I have song lists on my iPod called Cranky and Stressed, F the World, and Happiness, all designed around my various moods. Music can have a profound affect on my state of mind. I think this is true for most people, actually.

    The therapeutic value of music has long been known to the medical world. Famed neuropsychologist Oliver Sacks used music to engage his patients (this was dramatized in the movie The Music Never Stops, where a brain-damaged patient is able to recall memories otherwise lost when he hears the favorite music of his youth). (more…)

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    Women-centered design and mobile health: heads-up, 2014 mHealth Summit

    Jane Sarasohn-Kahn

    This post is written as part of the Disruptive Women on Health’s series celebrating the 2014 mHealth Summit taking place December 7-11 Washington, DC.

    Women and mobile health: let’s unpack the intersection.

    12.3 1On the supply side of the equation, Good Housekeeping covered health tracking-meets-fashion bling in the magazine a few weeks ago in article tucked between how to cook healthy Thanksgiving side dishes and tips on getting red wine stains out of tablecloths. This ad appeared in a major sporting goods chain’s 2014 Black Friday pre-print in my city’s newspaper last week. And along with consumer electronics brand faves like Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Samsung, Sony’s plans for a watch were hiding in plain sight on a Japanese crowdfunding site since September 2014; speaking of fashion-meets-wearables, the strap is designed to morph into 24 different designs. (more…)

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    Innovation when collaborating with Academia and Industry

    Nadine Afari

    More of the history of productive collaboration between engineers and scientists in academia and in the business entrepreneurship industry needs to be known. The primary beneficiary of this collaboration has been the public. But now, when the public might expect collaboration between academia and industry to be accelerating, it is not. Obstacles to efficient and effective collaboration leading to application have not allowed new technology to keep pace with ever-increasing need. In this analysis, based on experience in both academia and industry, the author provide perspective on current obstacles to academic–industrial collaboration, followed by recommendations on how effective collaboration can be renewed and enhanced.

    Consider the progress that has been made in our understanding of the complexity of biological systems and in the sophistication of research tools and methods during the last 50 years. When you compare this progress with progress in the healthcare industry in terms of new applications and productivity; there is a jarring difference. Even when healthcare innovators produce, the implementation and subsequent productivity gains from their new technologies is remarkably slow. (more…)

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    Mental Health Care Game-Changers: Technology and Social Networks

    Jen Hyatt

    Jen Hyatt

    The world of health care breeds innovative thinkers, radicals, people who see and act to ‘make things better.’ So why is health care so often not a place of change, but a place of stasis?

    Change can be disorientating, and large systems can suffer from barriers to innovations that are hard to break through. And while, with resolve and vision, these can be tackled it is much harder to bring about change that requires a shift in power. This sort of change tends to create fear, often legitimate, that something will have to be lost or given up to enable a change to become embedded. But, by using technology and social networks such changes in healthcare can be realized.

    (more…)

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    Health Anywhere-Data Everywhere: All Roads Lead to Data

    Meryl Bloomrosen

    I cannot help but notice (and comment) on the overwhelming number and type of notices, headlines, press releases, meet ups, mash-ups, Code-A-Thons and hackathons all around us.   Digital health is booming as is obvious by the types of emerging technologies and their capabilities.[1]  [2]  [3]  There seems to be a vast array of diverse options for remote, embedded, wearable, swallow able and implantable devices and gadgets.  Our houses, vehicles, furniture, and clothing are becoming wired to help sense, monitor, track and collect health related data.[4]  [5]   New terms, terminology and jargon abound (i.e., big data, little data, small data, open data,  open gov, the Internet of Things, cloud computing, and data analytics and visualization).

    Data are available from many sources including: genetics, health records, clinical registries, public use data files, birth and death registries, clinical trials, insurance claims, public and private sector surveys, drug interaction studies, and patient-generated sources. The availability of increasing amounts and types of data from such diverse data sources presents challenges (technical, technological, legal, political, financial, and cultural) and opportunities.[6]  The ubiquitous nature of devices and gadgets may indeed help patients and consumers have continuous data vital signs such as on blood pressure, temperature, heart rate and fitness indicators such as calories consumed, steps walked, miles run. (more…)

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    Are we stuck in a digital cul de sac?

    MLF pic

    Disruptive Women UK will be launching Tuesday, September 30th in the House of Commons. This post is a part of a series running up to the launch welcoming Disruptive Women UK.

    In the UK we have a problem. The big digital movers and shakers – Google, Twitter, LinkedIn, Amazon and many others – were founded in America. We are stuck in a cultural cul-de-sac. There are no easy answers as to why the UK does not have the digital confidence of the US, but we must do our best to tackle our low digital self-esteem. One reason is location. The UK is a test-bed for American companies before they go into other markets in Europe. Innovation from US companies is tried out in the UK at the earliest stage. When Google tests a game here before it goes international, it stamps out home grown innovation. My second observation would be about the dominance of the BBC. I believe it is a phenomenal organisation but a great deal of digital innovation in the UK has happened inside the corporation. It is impressive that the BBC develops something as good as the iPlayer so I would argue that this national institution is perhaps our best scale tech business – this presents interesting challenges as well as opportunities.

    There are basic structural difficulties with digital development. In the UK we are not especially ambitious entrepreneurs and this is true in the digital world. While the number of startups indexes well with other countries, growing them into global billion pound companies is rare. (more…)

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    The Best Innovations Come in ‘Human Size’

    Jenny-Hyatt--003Disruptive Women UK will be launching Tuesday, September 30th in the House of Commons. This post is a part of a series running up to the launch welcoming Disruptive Women UK.

    Recently, I was at TEDMED 2014 in San Francisco where game changers turned their minds to the future of science and humanity. Not even that famous fog could dampen the atmosphere, warmed by the sparks flying from ‘out of the box’ thinking.

    The world of health care breeds innovative thinkers, radicals, people who see and act to ‘make things better.’ So why is health care so often not a place of change, but a place of stasis? Why do large health care systems praise innovation, yet struggle to adopt at scale the radical changes that are needed?

    Change can be disorientating, and large systems can suffer from structural barriers to innovation that are hard to break through. And while, with resolve and vision, these can be tackled it is much harder to bring about change that requires a shift in power. (more…)

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    Iowa Accountability Program’s Judicial Training Institute Aims at Improving the Handling of Domestic Violence Cases

    iapDomestic violence is an epidemic that impacts an estimated 6,000 Iowans each year. While many view domestic violence as a private issue, Kimberly Baxter, Director of the Iowa Accountability Program, identifies how domestic violence is truly a community concern: “Domestic violence affects everyone from service providers to families and the community at large. We need to address domestic violence as a community. Brutality behind closed doors is not only real, but also taboo. It is not something we want to discuss, but if we cannot discuss it, how can we address it? How can we mitigate it?” For nearly ten years the Iowa Accountability Program (IAP) has worked to assist victims of domestic violence and the communities in Iowa that support them. This year, the IAP aims to strengthen its impact through its new Judicial Training Institute. (more…)

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    Another Innovator! Kate Rocks!

    kate millikenI love it when I find innovators and it’s my pleasure to introduce you another one, Kate Milliken. I never actually met Kate, but I saw her project on the crowdfunding platform Indiegogo and sought her out for this blog.

    For those who don’t know, crowdfunding is an opportunity to contribute relatively small amounts of money to creative, energetic, (more…)

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    Lava Mae

    The United Nations states that access to sanitation is a basic human right.  Yet, in the United States the homeless are often forced to go without access to showers. San Francisco is a prime example of this deficit where there are only 16-20 showers to service an estimated 4,500 homeless person population. Today, DW interviews Donnice Sandoval, creator of Lava Mae, a sustainable mobile shower for the homeless in San Francisco. She shows us that sometimes it truly is the simple things that are the most disruptive. 

    How were you inspired to create Lava Mae?

    Homelessness is an issue I’ve cared about for a long time. I live in a neighborhood that was once predominately middle class African American families. The dramatic gentrification that has overtaken the city has changed that. We’ve watched too many of our neighbors move from their homes to their cars and then the street. I wracked my brain for what we could do but could never figure out how to end or stem the tide of rising homelessness. Then one day I passed a young woman on the street who was homeless and crying, feeling that she’d never be clean. (more…)

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    Tech Will Transform the Doctor-Patient Relationship

    The doctor-patient relationship lies at the heart of much Western thinking about health. But only a few centuries ago, most people in the UK never saw a doctor.

    During the 19th century, the greatest strides in health and life expectancy came from improvements in nutrition, sewerage and water supply rather than the medics. But by the 20th century, doctors were much better informed about how to treat and prevent a number of illnesses. (more…)

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    I’m Innovating My Brains Out Over Here

    It's MeI was watching an episode of the sitcom Modern Family on TV the other day and one of the subplots was about one of the kids, Luke, trying to invent the next great kitchen innovation. Among his attempts are a toaster that butters and toasts simultaneously, the coffee-bot (never fully explained), and a self-flipping pancake whose mechanism of action is embedded popcorn. Phil lauds his son’s entrepreneurial spirit and zest for innovation.

    And why wouldn’t he? Innovation is everywhere these days and if you haven’t got an innovation initiative at your corporation or an investment strategy that supports is, you are so five minutes ago. Unfortunately the term “innovation” has become synonymous with the term “entrepreneurship” and, while often related, they are not the same thing. Innovation means the creation of something new and different. (more…)

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