Health Care Worries Top Terrorism, By Far, In Americans’ Minds

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn

This article was originally published in www.healthpopuli.com on February 8, 2017.

Americans-most-worried-about-health-care-costs-and-financial-situation-Monmouth-U-poll-Feb-2017

Health care is the top concern of American families, according to a Monmouth University Poll conducted in the week prior to Donald Trump’s Presidential inauguration.

Among U.S. consumers’ top ten worries, eight in ten directly point to financial concerns — with health care costs at the top of the worry-list for 25% of people. Health care financial worries led the second place concern, job security and unemployment, by a large margin (11 percentage points) In third place was “everyday bills,” the top concern for 12% of U.S. adults.

Immigration was the top worry for only 3% of U.S. adults; terrorism and national security represented 2% of the American public’s concerns.

In the 2015 Monmouth Poll, 15% said health care was their family’s main worry. Today, this issue is #1 for families across income categories and party affiliation. (more…)

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Super Bowl 2017

Founder and CEO SageMy™Life.

Founder and CEO SageMy™Life.

Regardless of whether your team won, you’ve no doubt been delighted, entertained and inspired by the commercials that aired last night. There are too many I liked to pick a favorite, but in the spirit of this blogspace, I yield my time and give my vote to Audi.

It’s a beautiful statement, to which I’ll add this. May he never have to explain to her:

  • Why she must pay more for access to health care than the men around her;
  • Why she – and not her male relatives or work colleagues – will need to leave the workforce to be an unpaid family caregiver, suffering a loss of income and retirement benefits; and
  • Why she may suffer unnecessarily because a women’s health didn’t get the attention it deserved.

Perhaps there are things you’d add to this list.

WATCH:


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Hostels for Hope: Easing the Burden for Women with Cancer

This article was originally published on www.impatientoptimists.org on February 2, 2017.

Sarah* is a 46-year-old mother of five and a cervical cancer survivor living in Tanzania. Survival wasn’t easy. She had to travel over 300 miles from her village to one of only two treatment facilities in the entire country; once she got there, she had no place to stay. Like Sarah, many of the over 10,000 Tanzanian women diagnosed with cervical or breast cancer each year face two major challenges – how to pay for transportation to the capital, Dar es Salaam, and where to stay for the duration of their treatment. For some women, the challenge is too great and they have no choice but to stay home and die. Others, like Sarah, make the difficult trip to the hospital, and struggle to survive through the treatment. Many sleep on the hospital grounds, or on the street, while being treated.

We at Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon believe that no woman should die of cervical or breast cancer, no matter where she lives. So we decided it was time for the women of Tanzania to have “homes away from home” near the country’s only two cancer treatment centers that could save their lives. We partnered with the American Cancer Society the Bush Institute HKS, Inc ., Southern Methodist University , and T-MARC Tanzania to sponsor the Hostels for Hope competition.

downloadWe challenged professional and student architects around the world to use fresh thinking, sustainable materials, and resourceful ingenuity to design safe, comfortable lodgings for women undergoing cancer treatments. And they responded! We received nearly 100 designs, and an esteemed jury chose six winners who will be announced on World Cancer Day , February 4, in Tanzania. The top two designs will be adapted according to the needs of the hospitals, and our hope is that they will be built in the coming year. (more…)

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Meet Disruptive Woman to Watch: Elizabeth Taylor

ElizabethTaylor2By any professional standards, Elizabeth Taylor is an extraordinarily skilled attorney.  What makes her special – and a Disruptive Woman to Watch for 2016 – is that she uses her gifts to improve the health and well-being of millions in need.

Taylor is executive director of the National Health Law Program (NHeLP).  The NHeLP is a nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting and advancing the health rights of low-income and underserved individuals.  As the organization describes itself, “NHeLP defends the nation’s health care safety net for those most in need and those with the fewest resources. We fight to give at-risk populations a voice in federal policy making, promote the rights of consumers in emerging managed-care systems, and advocate for creative solutions that preserve the government’s responsibility as the provider of last resort.” (more…)

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Recap – The Intersection of Health and Housing: Opportunities and Challenges Panel

Tim_HeadshotIt was an honest, eye-opening remark during the Alliance for Health Reform panel on Friday, when speaker Barbara DiPietro talked about a common obstacle for patients when they receive a prescription for an illness: many drugs have side effects, some of which may lead to a few more visits to the restroom. For most people with a permanent home or workspace, especially when it comes to making a recovery from an illness or condition, this is an inconvenient, but necessary, reality.

However, for homeless people who do not have access to bathroom facilities 24/7, they do not have the luxury of taking a treatment with such side effects; otherwise they risk a legal citation or worse, arrest, for public indecency. As a result, they choose to not use their medications to avoid going to jail, and thus, they do not get better and have a hard time improving their prospects of finding more permanent housing and employment. (more…)

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The State of Women in Healthcare: An Update

Halle Tecco

Exactly a year ago, we decided to publish the gender data on founders at Rock Health. Despite women being the majority of our team and our board, only 30% of our portfolio companies had a female founder (today, we are at almost 34%). Because we’d like to help our portfolio companies access a diverse talent pool, we began the XX in Health initiative nearly four years ago.

The aim of this initiative is to bring women together to network and support one another. The 2,400 members of the group share resources and ideas on LinkedIn and meet regularly across the country. This week we’re hosting a webinar on the topic for both men and women, and next week along with Disruptive Women, we’ll host our sixth XX in Health Retreat in NYC.

Today, through this initiative, we are proud to share our third annual report on the state of women in healthcare. Our past reports on this topic have been some of our most popular content, and we encourage you to share this report with your colleagues.

Women are still underrepresented in leadership positions in healthcare. (more…)

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“Give me your tired, your poor…”

Laura JacobsonThe rapid influx of unaccompanied immigrant children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border in the last few months has spurred a national conversation regarding the United States’ role in offering refuge to these children, the majority of whom are fleeing widespread gang violence and delinquency in their home countries of El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. A key talking point for some in the debate has become the supposed threat to public health that these children pose. (more…)

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Lava Mae

The United Nations states that access to sanitation is a basic human right.  Yet, in the United States the homeless are often forced to go without access to showers. San Francisco is a prime example of this deficit where there are only 16-20 showers to service an estimated 4,500 homeless person population. Today, DW interviews Donnice Sandoval, creator of Lava Mae, a sustainable mobile shower for the homeless in San Francisco. She shows us that sometimes it truly is the simple things that are the most disruptive. 

How were you inspired to create Lava Mae?

Homelessness is an issue I’ve cared about for a long time. I live in a neighborhood that was once predominately middle class African American families. The dramatic gentrification that has overtaken the city has changed that. We’ve watched too many of our neighbors move from their homes to their cars and then the street. I wracked my brain for what we could do but could never figure out how to end or stem the tide of rising homelessness. Then one day I passed a young woman on the street who was homeless and crying, feeling that she’d never be clean. (more…)

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Health Disparities in the LGBT Community and the Importance of Data

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) individuals are becoming increasingly visible in our society. Unfortunately, they are subjected to discrimination and stigma similar to other marginalized groups such as racial and ethnic minorities and people with disabilities. The current political and social context and unique health care needs, impact the health of LGBT individuals, resulting in health disparities (poorer health outcomes compared with their heterosexual and/or non-transgender peers). In order to identify and eliminate these disparities, health care providers must 1) be willing and able to competently gather information about whether their patient identifies as LGBT, 2) understand the risk factors associated with such identities, and 3) use that information to improve their patient’s health. Collection of sexual orientation and gender identity in public (more…)

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English Only

UnknownCurrently, I work at a wonderful community center in Little India in Chicago. In our youth program we have a diverse group of kids whose parents are from all over the world. English is every child’s second language. Daily, I come in to work and bask in the beauty of the students conversing in their mother tongues. This is what community means to me.

So, I was dismayed the day one of my co-workers asked a couple of our students to speak English only while at program. I asked her what was the problem and she said that we had an English-only policy. I was floored. I was never told about this policy and I regularly converse in Spanish with our Spanish-speaking students. My co-worker said the policy is always in place but had not been enforced by the last program director. Shortly after this incident, the new director had a group meeting and reminded the students and tutors that they had to speak English during program. (more…)

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Health Equity: A Moral and Economic Imperative

Wrenn_Headshot (2)Growing up the 7th and much-planned child of a newly remarried physician father and college-educated, homemaker mother, I had many unearned advantages and opportunities not afforded to my elder siblings. My younger brother and myself were born during times of prosperity and opportunity. A blended family, one could speculate on the biological and genetic differences that contributed to disparate paths among the children, and a full discussion of the multi-determined factors that contribute to “success” in parenting is beyond the scope of this article. What I’d like to invite you to consider, is my premise that striving towards health equity is both a moral and economic imperative.  In my attempt to unite disparate political (more…)

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Finding the Words: Gender Affirmation and Language

UnknownThis article will be a little more personal than my previous articles. I want to share a bit about myself, my identity and what it means to me to be seen and affirmed.

Monday, March 31, was the International Transgender Day of Visibility, but I was just as invisible as any other day. You see, I’m not out on the job. I haven’t told my co-workers or my students that I’m genderqueer. They don’t know my preferred pronouns and they default to feminine pronouns based on who they perceive me to be. It hurts and I hate it.

I probably could come out. I know the laws in Illinois and I’m protected under anti-discrimination laws. My co-workers are pretty decent people, they might understand, right? I may never know. All I know is the tightness in my chest and stomach when I think about having “the talk” with them. I feel nauseous and anxious like I need to hide or curl up in a ball. I also feel dishonest and a bit deceitful. Fear keeps me silent and holds (more…)


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  • April 7th, 2014 The City of Brotherly Love and the Kids We Need to Love Better
    By Glenna Crooks
  • A Hand Up, Not a Handout: Paycheck to Paycheck and the Voice of 43 Million

    Janice Lynch Schuster

    Once, as a child, I remember crying at the sight of a commercial for CARE. In the old days, we did not have 24/7, real-time access to the suffering of others, and I suppose the shock of it hit me in some way.

    And then the years passed, and whether meaning to or not, we seem to have grown accustomed to what we see. As the entertainment industry grows ever more out-there in its portrayals of suffering, cruelty, and violence, the heart finds it better to harden, or be overwhelmed.

    Which is why I was so thrown off when, at a screening of the new HBO Documentary, Paycheck to Paycheck: The Life & Times of Katrina Gilbert, I burst into tears. The focus of the film is Katrina Gilbert, a 30-year old Southerner and single mother with three young children. Her story is meant to put a face on the numbers, the 42 million women The Shriver Report counts as being on the ever-present brink of abject poverty—and the 23 million young children who depend on them. (more…)

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    Let’s Talk About It: Trans* Youth and Suicide Prevention

    UnknownAs discussed in my previous article, bullying and discrimination take a toll on young people. In addition to physical symptoms, it can lead to depression, self-harm and, for some, suicide. This is particularly true for queer and trans* youth.

    There are a lot of statistics about suicide among youth, particularly suicide among LGB youth. There is also quite a bit of research on mental health and transgender adults. However, I was hard pressed to find much research that specifically addresses transgender youth and suicide prevention. Although, there is overlap with other research on youth, and many of the same issues that affect transgender adults, also affect transgender teens, it is important to consider the unique difficulties that transgender youth face. (more…)

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