Innovate or Captivate? The Courtship of ‘Generation C’

Nancy Green

There will be a lot of innovation on the floor of the mHealth Summit next week in Washington, D.C. —products and solutions designed to push the envelope on applied technology for healthcare.  For quite some time, the race to innovate has compelled tech enthusiasts and entrepreneurs alike to first conceptualize and then develop solutions that will be hailed as “new.”  After all, new is different.  New is better.  What the customer wants, we are convinced, is something new.  So we dazzle them with a new gadget or a new capability far more often than is necessary or even worthwhile.

But there is an emerging generation of tech consumers pushing back on this assumption with a new demand:  “Don’t give me something new; give me something I need.”  Say hello to Generation C—the most digitally connected, communicating, and “clicking” generation of any before it.  Born after 1990, they are the iEverything generation, and they have lived their entire lives on the cutting edge of technology and connectivity. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

Healthcare’s Renewable Resource: Authentic Patient Experience

kym

Cancer is my medical degree. Navigating my way through three distinct cancer diagnoses across three unique stages of life and managing three different treatment paths is my specialty. In the course of enduring Hodgkin’s Lymphoma at age 17, melanoma at 38 and, in 2012, breast cancer at 46, I’ve amassed firsthand expertise in the critical areas of patient-provider communications, care coordination, patient safety, insurance reconciliation, disease prevention, and personalized treatment planning.

From the time of my first cancer diagnosis over 30 years ago to today, cancer has influenced my life and risk of future disease. To put my experience in perspective, the collective time I spent in the throes of surgery, recovery and treatment of my two most significant diagnoses – Hodgkin’s lymphoma and breast cancer –totals twelve months. So, I have spent only 1/30th of my cancer experience fully immersed in the healthcare system. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

Women-centered design and mobile health: heads-up, 2014 mHealth Summit

Jane Sarasohn-Kahn

This post is written as part of the Disruptive Women on Health’s series celebrating the 2014 mHealth Summit taking place December 7-11 Washington, DC.

Women and mobile health: let’s unpack the intersection.

12.3 1On the supply side of the equation, Good Housekeeping covered health tracking-meets-fashion bling in the magazine a few weeks ago in article tucked between how to cook healthy Thanksgiving side dishes and tips on getting red wine stains out of tablecloths. This ad appeared in a major sporting goods chain’s 2014 Black Friday pre-print in my city’s newspaper last week. And along with consumer electronics brand faves like Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Samsung, Sony’s plans for a watch were hiding in plain sight on a Japanese crowdfunding site since September 2014; speaking of fashion-meets-wearables, the strap is designed to morph into 24 different designs. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

Passport Stamped for the Land of Pain: Learning to Live in a Foreign Land

Janice Lynch Schuster

The following post originally ran on the Pain Action Alliance to Implement a National Strategy’s (PAINS) website.

For many years, my passport was stamped in the land of the well, but a poor response to oral surgery in 2013 cancelled that document, leaving me in the land of the sick, the suffering, the other. While I was a well-one, I’d hear stories from that other country—and listen as best I could when others told tales of their visits– but I did not know what it truly meant to live there all the time.

Learning to live in another country is hard work. There are unfamiliar customs to understand, a language to learn, awkward situations, foods and beds and places that do not quite feel like home. The currency may not convert.

Once you become a chronic pain patient, as I have, you discover how much of your life is no longer your own. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

Consumer Centricity: Changing what we know about Health Care

Cyndy Nayer

Consumer Centricity is about to change everything we know about health care. It is creating a health investment community where transparency is king and social exchange reinforces value.

This is the rise of the consumer health investment marketplace. Technology is improving the conversations and exchange of data—social media (providing peer-to-peer information and counseling), quantifying technology (providing measures of health to the person without the need for clinical reporting), and financial advice (tune in to some of the social media pages for patient and cost advocacy). We are witnessing the handoff of health care control to the consumer who does, in fact, have a bigger financial stake than ever before, but who also can leverage data for answers to personal questions and priorities.

At last the consumer is developing a voice in health care, identifying the priorities of lifelong health that he or she values. There are 4 reasons that consumers are building noise on their preference in health care:

  1. Enormous increases in consumer-driven health plans with high deductibles. (more…)


Subscribe to our newsletter

Mental Health Care Game-Changers: Technology and Social Networks

Jen Hyatt

Jen Hyatt

The world of health care breeds innovative thinkers, radicals, people who see and act to ‘make things better.’ So why is health care so often not a place of change, but a place of stasis?

Change can be disorientating, and large systems can suffer from barriers to innovations that are hard to break through. And while, with resolve and vision, these can be tackled it is much harder to bring about change that requires a shift in power. This sort of change tends to create fear, often legitimate, that something will have to be lost or given up to enable a change to become embedded. But, by using technology and social networks such changes in healthcare can be realized.

(more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

Health Anywhere-Data Everywhere: All Roads Lead to Data

Meryl Bloomrosen

I cannot help but notice (and comment) on the overwhelming number and type of notices, headlines, press releases, meet ups, mash-ups, Code-A-Thons and hackathons all around us.   Digital health is booming as is obvious by the types of emerging technologies and their capabilities.[1]  [2]  [3]  There seems to be a vast array of diverse options for remote, embedded, wearable, swallow able and implantable devices and gadgets.  Our houses, vehicles, furniture, and clothing are becoming wired to help sense, monitor, track and collect health related data.[4]  [5]   New terms, terminology and jargon abound (i.e., big data, little data, small data, open data,  open gov, the Internet of Things, cloud computing, and data analytics and visualization).

Data are available from many sources including: genetics, health records, clinical registries, public use data files, birth and death registries, clinical trials, insurance claims, public and private sector surveys, drug interaction studies, and patient-generated sources. The availability of increasing amounts and types of data from such diverse data sources presents challenges (technical, technological, legal, political, financial, and cultural) and opportunities.[6]  The ubiquitous nature of devices and gadgets may indeed help patients and consumers have continuous data vital signs such as on blood pressure, temperature, heart rate and fitness indicators such as calories consumed, steps walked, miles run. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

The Rise of Consumer Centricity: Comments on the Gamechanging Opportunities

Cyndy Nayer

In commenting on the new IMS Pharma Letter, we highlight the emergence and widespread build up of the consumer’s role in prevention, care and outcomes. Consumer centricity is being driven by the rise of CDHP (consumer directed health plans), but it’s quite different from these insurance products, with their high deductibles and variable co-pays.

Consumers are learning and experiencing more about consumer-directed health plans (CDHP) as they enter the exchanges, even though CDHP has been around for fifteen years or more.  Most new health insurance products have a deductible that must be met, so consumers must pay for services and treatments until they reach that goal.  NOTE:  the ACA (Obamacare) mandates that no individual pay more than $6350 in total out-of-pocket costs in Y2014).  If they have not paid the sum, they will pay more of their own money for the care.

Consumer centricity in health care means that control for choice of service and for outcomes will shift to the  consumers and they will become the ultimate arbiters in their health and health care.  It’s a value-based concept that drives this shift in decision-making. IT supports the data so that the consumer can decide where, when, why and who to choose for care based upon personal preferences and goals, total costs, incentives to engage and time to get to the outcome preferred. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

Iowa Accountability Program’s Judicial Training Institute Aims at Improving the Handling of Domestic Violence Cases

iapDomestic violence is an epidemic that impacts an estimated 6,000 Iowans each year. While many view domestic violence as a private issue, Kimberly Baxter, Director of the Iowa Accountability Program, identifies how domestic violence is truly a community concern: “Domestic violence affects everyone from service providers to families and the community at large. We need to address domestic violence as a community. Brutality behind closed doors is not only real, but also taboo. It is not something we want to discuss, but if we cannot discuss it, how can we address it? How can we mitigate it?” For nearly ten years the Iowa Accountability Program (IAP) has worked to assist victims of domestic violence and the communities in Iowa that support them. This year, the IAP aims to strengthen its impact through its new Judicial Training Institute. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

Good Things Come to Those Who Weight…

Displaying image.jpegSummer is almost over, the kids are already or getting ready to go back to school, the sun sets sooner than it did three months ago and the crisp air of fall is settling in. For many, this is enough to go back to your regularly scheduled programs of snuggling on the couch, watching your favorite fall premiere shows (come on Walking Dead!), getting out of the summer routine of enjoying outdoor activities and  trying to maintain the New Year’s resolutions that you set in January to get beach and summer ready. But I do not want to GET summer ready. I want to STAY summer ready. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

Food Sensitivity and Intolerance Testing Changed Their Lives

Terri Prof Headshot 0412Susan was tired; tired of feeling foggy, bloated and unable to lose weight.  Her thyroid levels were out of whack and she felt awful.  Having just recently passed her 50th birthday, she assumed that this was what it meant to be a woman of a “certain age”:  A little heavier and slower than she would have liked, not quite as sharp, and generally, just feeling old.

It wasn’t until she watched other people coming into a lab that she co-owns and heard them talk about food intolerances did she consider that food might be causing her problems, not her age.  Changes to their diets, made after food intolerance testing, seemed to have worked miracles for her customers. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

August 2014 Man of the Month: Michael G. Dermer

md An innovator, author, entrepreneur and health leader,  our August Man of the Month, Michael  G. Dermer, is a true disruptor in the health care industry. Michael G. Dermer is the Senior Vice President and Chief Incentive Officer of Welltok. Prior to his current role, Michael was the founder and CEO of IncentOne, the first company that in 2003 identified incentives in health care as a critical solution to driving cost savings and engagement.  Since then, he has been guiding health plans, partners and employers in how to use incentives to deliver cost reductions. Today, he shares with us his perspective on what consumers think about rewards in health insurance plans.

 

  (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

ER Visits: Is Traumatic Brain Injury on the Rise?

Is it all in your head? Some new research suggests that more and more people are visiting the ER for traumatic brain injuries. A study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, analyzed the national trends in ER visits and noted a link in increased number of traumatic brain injuries. The researchers analyzed data from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) database. This is a database that tracks emergency visits, and the reason for those visits.

What Researchers Found (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

The Day I Made Peace with an Errant Organ

c Here’s my theory: few health crises in life are as traumatic as surviving a cardiac event. I developed this theory while I was busy having my own heart attack in the spring of 2008.

For starters, heart attack symptoms often come out of the blue (in fact, almost two-thirds of women who die of coronary heart disease have no previous symptoms. Having a heart attack can feel so unimaginably terrifying that almost all of us try desperately to dismiss or deny cardiac symptoms. And according to a 2013 report published in Global Heart, the journal of the World Heart Federation, women are twice as likely to die within one year even if they do survive a heart attack compared to our male counterparts.

So if – and each of these is still, sadly, a great big fat IF for too many women – we survive the actual cardiac event, and if we are near a hospital that’s able to provide an experienced team of cardiologists/cardiovascular surgeons/cardiac nurses, and if we are correctly diagnosed, and if we receive timely and appropriate treatment, and if the resulting damage to our oxygen-deprived heart muscle is not too severe, we get to finally go home, safe and sound.

And that’s where the real trauma starts.   (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter

“Give me your tired, your poor…”

Laura JacobsonThe rapid influx of unaccompanied immigrant children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border in the last few months has spurred a national conversation regarding the United States’ role in offering refuge to these children, the majority of whom are fleeing widespread gang violence and delinquency in their home countries of El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. A key talking point for some in the debate has become the supposed threat to public health that these children pose. (more…)

Subscribe to our newsletter