Consumer Centricity: Changing what we know about Health Care

Cyndy Nayer

Consumer Centricity is about to change everything we know about health care. It is creating a health investment community where transparency is king and social exchange reinforces value.

This is the rise of the consumer health investment marketplace. Technology is improving the conversations and exchange of data—social media (providing peer-to-peer information and counseling), quantifying technology (providing measures of health to the person without the need for clinical reporting), and financial advice (tune in to some of the social media pages for patient and cost advocacy). We are witnessing the handoff of health care control to the consumer who does, in fact, have a bigger financial stake than ever before, but who also can leverage data for answers to personal questions and priorities.

At last the consumer is developing a voice in health care, identifying the priorities of lifelong health that he or she values. There are 4 reasons that consumers are building noise on their preference in health care:

  1. Enormous increases in consumer-driven health plans with high deductibles. (more…)


Breast Cancer Prevention: My “Mommy Musts”

Amber Coleman-MortleyI spend a large portion of my time caring for, looking after, and maintaining the health and wellbeing of others.  Amidst all of the scheduling of my work life and the kids’ respective social lives, the hours of my day quickly evaporate into vague memories of daily routine. Not once do I stop and think about myself, my health and often my own needs.  And why should I?  Like all “good” mothers, my needs come second to theirs.

Recently, my child randomly said to me, “Mom I can’t imagine our life without you”. That gave me pause.  I thought about it and felt the same. Who would do the cooking, the cleaning and all the neurotic yelling about clothes and toys on the floor? That sentence made me think of my mortality in a deeper way. To these little people, I mean something.  Do I respect that?

This moment took me back to when my own mother informed me (a young adult at the time) that she had found a lump and was going in to get it checked.  (more…)

The Art of Survivoring

janeblackA week from today I will be the keynote presenter at the “Ladies Night Out – Give Cancer the Boot” annual gala for the Springfield Regional Cancer Center (SRCC).  I am flattered and daunted by this opportunity to share my thoughts with an audience of 400 patients, survivors and their champions.  The date of the event falls on the 6th anniversary of my mastectomy – how fortunate I am to celebrate with kindred spirits!

I will open with this claim:  The richest and most profound experiences happen when what we believe to be real and true about ourselves is turned upside down.  (If you’ve seen Brene Brown’s TED talks you know that this is a precious part of the transition process.)

Then I will chime in about my driving force – to attract and to radiate positive energy.  Period.  This is my metric for success. (more…)

How Social Media Helped Me Through My Breast Cancer Treatment

MandiDisruptive Women previously ran this post in November 2013, but given its message felt it was worth running again during our breast cancer awareness series.

Social media opened a world of connections for me when I was a patient undergoing breast cancer treatment. It became a mechanism where I could reach out to say “hi,” to console, or just to yell out into the world when I was angry.

I actually started blogging about my breast cancer treatment because my aunt kept a blog through the course of her treatment (she was usually a few months behind on updating, so I vowed to be a little timelier when it came to writing posts). It was a great method for updating my really large extended family and I found that writing things down that were emotional for me, helped me process the emotions. (more…)

We Are All Survivors, If Only for a While

Janice Lynch Schuster

Those of us still lucky enough to call this Earth home have all survived something that 50 or 100 years ago would have killed us: childbirth, for instance, or workplace accidents, infections and diseases. And most of us have survived any number of challenges and losses: deaths, illnesses, jobs, loves. Many of the relationships and activities that we love do, at some time, come to an end. Some of us will survive because we have endured great harm and abuse.

When we see and name ourselves as survivors, we feel that we are somehow still masters—that challenges formed us, but did not claim or shape us. Survivorship reflects our most admirable qualities: strengths and resilience, resourcefulness and ability to stand and stay strong.

Every October, while we celebrate another month of raising awareness of breast cancer (as pink festoons everything from pickle jars to football gloves, until we yearn to shrug it off or dye it black) we rejoice with those who have endured this disease and emerged, still standing and alive. (more…)



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