A Week of Music and Health Quality

Cyndy Nayer

Highlights from Stevie Wonder and the meetings of Boston and DC.

albumsIt was a week of meetings, concert, new ideas, gorgeous weather, and finding new friends–a week of quality, indeed.  Here are some findings, some musings, and some encouragement to all who are seeking to build quality and safety into health outcomes.

Boston:  No surprise that this beautiful city is accelerating some of the changes we want to see in health care and health outcomes. Meetings with new folks have fueled my energy in advancing the agenda in the all-important Rx development and access.  What’s missing is the value of new and developing treatments in improving the total value proposition:  what’s the worth in a family (quality of life during treatment), a worksite (lower absenteeism and lowering income loss), and to a person (less side effects, easier adherence, getting to cure [where possible]).  Of course I’ve written about this before (Framework for Outcomes-Based ContractingSovaldi Value of a CureSovaldi OBC Contract–Kiss is Still a Kiss), providing the business and outcomes models for using a high-cost drug that gets the person to goal. (more…)

Struggling with Diabetes? You’re Not Alone

Terri Prof Headshot 0412If you know someone with diabetes, you know how much disruption, discomfort and inconvenience it can cause: dietary restrictions to control blood sugar, frequent finger pricks to monitor glucose levels, injections to deliver insulin and the constant fear that your levels will spike or plummet. All of this effort is necessary to manage the ubiquitous disease. Not managing it well or ignoring it could cause a seizure, a coma, or some other truly unpleasant side effects of irregular blood sugar levels.

While the most extreme health issues have been widely known for type 1 diabetes, more Americans are being sucked into sedentary, high caloric, unhealthy lifestyles causing an epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Both can cause stroke, blindness, heart disease, neuropathy (nerve pain), kidney damage and limb amputations and those diagnosed with diabetes have shorter life expectancies.

Bob K. knows all too well the difficulties of living with diabetes.  Diagnosed with type 1 diabetes as a young boy, he is now 90 years old and is the longest living diabetic on record. But he will tell you it has not been easy. (more…)

Lift Every Voice: Listen to Women Veterans

Janice Lynch Schuster

During last week’s Veteran’s Day inspired concerts and tributes to veterans, a Hill-gathering of Disruptive Women (and our man of the month, Rep. Tim Walz, MN) spoke truth with power. Gathered to discuss challenges faced by women veterans, the group included veterans, members of Congress and their spouses, congressional staff, state leaders, and filmmakers. The group had had enough of platitudes and promises. We were ready for disruption, and Rep. Walz delivered just that, saying he was done with “incremental change” (Washington’s latest, favorite buzz-word) and prepared to lead “seismic change.”

walz panelWalz speaks from a place of experience, knowledge, and passion: He is a retired soldier, and the highest rank ranking enlisted man to serve in Congress. During a 24 year stint in the Army National Guard, including a tour of duty in Operation Enduring Freedom, he also taught high school. The latter tour provided him some insight into chaos and disruption. In the 113th Congress, he will serve in leadership roles that include the National Guard and Reserves Caucus, and the Congressional Veterans Jobs.

In his remarks, Walz noted that “it doesn’t take much to offer health care that people can’t access.” He added that although the VA has made some progress since the days when “the best thing the VA could say for what it had done for women was that the exam tables no longer  that face the door.” Later, he added that the VA system—staffed by dedicated people—still has far to go to really offer care for all, noting that, “it is much easier to put up a yellow ribbon then it is to step up care.” (more…)

An Attitude of Gratitude

Amber Coleman-MortleyWe live in a community where there are a lot of military personnel.  We often see them in uniform coming and going during the morning and evening commute.  My children never really noticed until one day I randomly thanked a guy for his service.  I had been having a really bad week and for some reason seeing this man in uniform reminded me that there was a lot in my life to be thankful for.  Acting on impulse  I abruptly blurted out, “Thank you so much for your service”.  The guy smiled a shy smile and went on about his day.

Puzzled, one of my kids says, “Mommy what are you thanking him for?  Who was he?”.

“Well people like him, and others you see dressed in uniform, are making a huge sacrifice. Their spouses, their children, their siblings and their mommies and daddies are all making a sacrifice so that the rest of us can go to buy gasoline to go places we love; buy the toys and things we like; have ideas and express them; safely walk our streets without the threat of bombs.  (more…)

The Women Soldiers Speak of Service, and the War Each Day Brings

Janice Lynch Schuster

Cold plunged in from the north
and gripped us with errors of calculation.
We fell to our knees, crumpled heating
bills in our hands, and tried to decide
which worry mattered more:
the goiter on my throat,
blurred vision in swollen eyes,
the baby and her daycare?
Who needs new tires first,
and how long can we burn
kerosene before it kills us? (more…)




   Event Photos

View all event photos »

   Ebooks

Our newest eBook "The Different Faces of Caregiving" explores the state of caregiving in the United States. Download it today!
Download our two new ebooks »
   Are you Disruptive?

Disruptive Women is looking for submissions from women in the health care field, from doctors and nurses to policy experts and legislators. Learn more »
   Media
Find out where you can find our Disruptive Women on TV, in the news and on bookshelves.
Read more details »